And They Laid Him In The Tomb

Spirit Rising
Spirit Rising
Naval Officer
Naval Officer
Eternal Love and Sadness
Eternal Love and Sadness
Guardian Angel
Guardian Angel
The Lion Of Eternity
The Lion Of Eternity

Throughout Christian Churches today hundreds of thousands of people around the world heard the words,
“Joseph bought a linen cloth, took Him down, wrapped Him in the linen cloth and laid Him in a tomb which had been hewn out in the rock; and he rolled a stone against the entrance of the tomb.”

A tomb, the final resting place where the epitaph is forged into stone, concrete and marble trying to bring a sense of permanence when confronted with the stark reality of impermanence. In late 1835, a grieving father John Jay Smith, noted that “Philadelphia’s living population has multiplied beyond the means of accommodation for death.” One year later, Smith with partners Nathan Dunn, Benjamin Richards and Frederick Brown conceived of Laurel Hill Cemetery. Three design concepts influenced every part of this new endeavor. It had to be situated in a picturesque location well outside the city; there would be no religious affiliation; and it must provide a permanent burial space for the dead in a restful and tranquil setting. It became the nation’s second major rural cemetery with a rolling landscape of 78 acres, horticultural plantings and eclectic architecture and sculptures. Laurel Hill was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1998. Names such as Rittenhouse, Widner, Elkins and Strawbridge are just a few of the Philadelphia magnates buried here. General Meade and 39 other Civil War era generals reside here along with 6 Titanic passengers. Picnics, strolls, carriage rides and sightseeing were popular pastimes in Laurel Hill’s early days. This site continues to draw history buffs, ghosts hunters, joggers, bicyclists, nature lovers, sketch artists, and photographers. It has become a must see destination for tourists…Rocky came here often to visit his beloved Adrian! So on this day, I wondered down landscaped paths, camera around my neck, intrigued by ways tombs may provide a glimpse within.

The tomb of William Warner is both striking and unique. It was created by Alexander Milne Calder, the son of a Scottish tombstone carver who went on to sculpt more than 250 pieces for Philadelphia’s City Hall as well as the colossal bronze statue of William Penn that crowns the tower. This dramatic sculpture lying atop of the tomb depicts the soul escaping from the coffin and is often referred to as a prime example of American Victorian funerary art. Lions were used to signify the qualities of those laid to rest as well as serving to symbolize an eternal vigil. Ivy stands for eternal life. When I came upon a broken column, I knew a life was taken too soon or suddenly. Draped urns topped off headstones relating a permanent state of sadness and mourning for the family left to carry on. Obelisks and mausoleums with Tiffany stained glass windows attest in death to a life of wealth with the richest closest to the river. Angles were believed to protect people on earth and guide them to heaven. One gravesite definitely provides a glimpse of its inhabitant… with a large microphone and two seats from Veterans Stadium, one can sit for a moment to remember all the years of listening to the Philadelphia Phillies announcer with that distinct voice, the memorable Harry Kalas! ( I wonder if they can make a camera that large!)

When I came upon the bronze epitaph of General Hugh Mercer, I became very curious about the man in the tomb. It read, “A physician of Fredericksburg, Virginia, was distinguished for his skill and learning, his gentleness and decision, his refinement and humanity, his elevated honour and his devotion to the great cause of civil and religious liberty.” Words connected us… the living with the dead, the present with the past.

“Overlooking the river, there is a stone sculpture capturing the tenderness of a mother for her children. Henry Dmoghowski Saunders, a polish sculptor whose work is on display in the U.S. Capital poured his grief into this piece. The Mother sits holding her babies overlooking the river where they drowned in 1855 and she joined them in death two years later. All repose together. After completing this very sad monument, Henry, the father and husband of this family, returned to Europe and never returned to America.
Death becomes a teacher of life if we listen to the messages in silence. On this monument was the inscription: “We should count time in heart throbs. He most lives who thinks most. Feels the nobelest. Acts the Best.”

On this day of quiet reflection those who were laid in the tomb reminded me how I want to live!

Laurel Hill Cemetery “The Hot Spots and Storied Plots” tour is presented monthly – 4th Friday and 2nd Saturday tour series. It is a very informative overview of the cemetery’s long and colorful history.

2016 The Year of the Fire Monkey

The Chinese New Year celebration began on February 8th. Philadelphia’s Chinatown put on a grand street parade today which included a performance by the very colorful lion dancers. The lion symbolizes courage, stability and superiority. The loud noise of the firecrackers going off and a mirror on the head of the lion frightens away the evil spirits. The Lion goes in search of the lettuce hung above doors. It “eats” the lettuce and a rolling crescendo from the drums, cymbals and gongs is heard as the lion spits back the leaves. This symbolizes a fresh start and a blessing upon the business. The movements of the tail of the lion is meant to sweep away the bad fortune from the year before. Hidden within the lettuce is a red envelope containing money from the shop owner thanking the lion for the blessing of luck and prosperity in the New Year. Oranges are also given and seen as a symbol of luck. There is usually an actor dressed as a fan bearer with a huge smile to remind us to approach the future with good humor and flexibility.

2016 is designated as the year of the Fire Monkey. Chinese Zodiac.com covers all the interesting facts related to personality, health, career, relationships and compatibility with other signs.

The Monkey is mischievous, lively and energetic…can you see me smiling?!!!

Happy New Year!

"In Wait"
“In Wait”
Happy New Year!
Smiling Fan Bearer!
New Meaning for Hip Hop
New Meaning for Hip Hop
Reaching Out for a Bit of Luck
Reaching Out for a Bit of Luck
Firecracker Explosions
Firecracker Explosions

Of course what would a visit to Chinatown be without eating?!
The Nan Zhow Hand Drawn Noodle House Inc. located at 1022 Race Street in Chinatown is by far one of my favorite restaurants. If you visit their web site, be sure to read the interesting history of the pulled noodles and check out their vast menu. Ending our visit with the wonderful staff, the delicious noodles topped with peanut sauce and a large take out bag was a perfect finishing touch for this day celebrating vitality and fun! The first of many!

Nan Zhou Hand Drawn Noodle House Inc.
Nan Zhou Hand Drawn Noodle House Inc.
Nan Zhou Hand Drawn Noodle House
Nan Zhou Hand Drawn Noodle House

Mummers’ Parade 2013 and New Year’s Traditions

“Tis New Year’s Day! What interesting traditions we have as we move from one year to the next. If I were in South America, last night I would have had a major decision to make about the color of my underwear…yellow would symbolize a hope for abundance. Red would show a yearning for love in the New Year and white would simply mean a desire for peace. I wonder how many people go to a tied dyed approach to get them all in! Scarecrows made up of old clothes are burned on the front lawn while the old calendars are thrown from windows. Speaking of which, I heard on the local news station yesterday that various and assorted items are dropped from high levels at the stroke of midnight…large potatoe chip bags, lebanon bologna and a possum drop in N. Carolina and Georgia (PETA has expressed their total distaste of this one). Here in Philadelphia for the past 113 years and still going strong, grown men (women referred to as the wenches brigade and children) all get dressed in feathers, sequins and umbrellas and strut their stuff up Broad Street and all of this is perfectly normal! They have perfected the art of partying for sure! I wonder what color their underwear is????????

Gifting of the Beads!The New Normal!Guess Who I Am!Here's To The Red, White and Blue!Long lines for the bathroom!The Mummers' StrutThe Strong!  The Bold! The Beautiful!Hey Philly!Your Normal Run of the Mill Rabbit on the Street

Philadelphia Festivals

I don’t know why so many people call Memorial Day the unofficial start to the summer…we all know it IS the start of the summer! “Let the games begin!” Here in Philadelphia, it is marked by a weekend of festivals. We are big on street fairs and Thursday night, thousands poured into the Northern Liberties section of the city for the beginning of the summer “Night Market”. The New York Times recently quoted Diana Iskolsky Minkus, the night market coordinator for the Food Trust organizing the event.”The inspiration came from pop-up events developed by vendors’ organizations in places like San Francisco as well as the fabled night markets of Hong Kong and Taiwan.” Northern Liberties has converted abandoned factories into artists’ residences so creativity certainly abounds in this area in the food, dress, art and music. 47 vendors offered food all for $5.00 and under. I tried fried milk curd from Wisconsin, pesto pizza from Rustica, cupcakes from Brown Betty and gelato from Capogiro which was listed in National Geographic as one of the top 10 places to eat ice cream…I agree (and I want a job like that with National Geographic!) all while sitting out, listening to great music and watching the people passing by! Perfect night out and looking forward to the next Night Market in South Philadelphia in June.

For the past 5 years, I have been going to the Annunciation + Evangelismos Greek Orthodox Church annual Opa Festival. This is their 34th year of “Opaing”!(joyfully celebrating) and it always runs from Thursday night through to Monday. I was excited and got there a bit early so I was able to wander through the church which was beautiful with the light streaming through the windows lighting up the beautiful Byzantine Art. There are tables and tables of homemade food…souvlaki (pork or chicken on pita bread, tomatoes, onions and tzatziki), spanakopita (crispy fillo crust filled with a blend of Greek cheeses), dolmades (rice-stuffed grape leaves) to name just a few. I may not be able to pronounce some of the names, but I did well just pointing away! It is amazing to me that the parishoners make enough food to last for four days (the loaves and the fishes all over again!). Nothing like eating food prepared with love. There is Greek folk dancing, music, jewelry, gifts and paintings. The address is 7921 Old York Rd., Elkins Park, Pa. 19027 if you are in the neighborhood…they are still partying!

Tomorrow I should probably go and exercise so I can fit into my bathing suit for the official beginning of summer!

Copyright 2012 Frances Schwabenland. Images may not be copied, printed or otherwise disseminated without express written permission of Frances Schwabenland.